Category Archives: MATE

How Polish Plurals in MATE Went Broken

On March 13, 2017 the new version 1.18 of MATE Desktop was released. One of the last minute changes in the project was pulling the most recent translations from Transifex. Usually this is a good thing but apparently for the Polish language this turned out to be a little disaster because the plural rules have been (incorrectly) changed.

Plural rules

Foreign readers deserve an explanation here. Polish plural rules (as well as of several other Slavic languages) are a little more complex than English. There are three forms required:

  • 1 – singular – that’s obvious and similar to English and other Indo-European languages.
  • 2, 3, 4, and anything ending with 2, 3, 4 except 12, 13, 14 (for example: 22, 23, 24, 32, 33, 34 and so on). This group is sometimes referred to as few in some internationalization toolkits.
  • everything else (5 and greater except the numbers mentioned above). This group is sometimes referred to as many.

Plurals support in gettext package is good and complete. All we need is to write the correct rules in the header of a *.po file. This task should be done once and the rules can be reused for every translation into the same language because the grammar rules don’t change often, we can safely assume that they never change. Usually for Polish translations we use this formula:

"Plural-Forms: nplurals=3; plural=(n==1 ? 0 : n%10>=2 && n%10<=4 && (n%100<10 || n%100>=20) ? 1 : 2);n"

This expression is neither simple nor complex. Just sufficient to describe what the language needs.

Here comes the disaster

On March 13 the commit synchronizing translations from Transifex changed the plural rules for Polish language. The new formula is:

“Plural-Forms: nplurals=4; plural=(n==1 ? 0 : (n%10>=2 && n%10<=4) && (n%100<12 || n%100>=14) ? 1 : n!=1 && (n%10>=0 && n%10<=1) || (n%10>=5 && n%10<=9) || (n%100>=12 && n%100<=14) ? 2 : 3);n" [/code] Now this is complex, isn't it? What's wrong with this expression:

  • it states that Polish language needs 4 forms to support plurals which is not true;
  • it is unnecessarily complex: if the expression states that n==1 belongs to the group 0 there is no need to make sure that n!=1 in the further part;
  • the complexity leads to one actual bug: the second group includes all numbers which end with 2, 3, 4 (correct), except 12 and 13 (incorrect, 14 must be excluded as well);
  • the result 3 is unreachable which is correct but confusing for translators.

As MATE Desktop is a large project consisting of multiple applications (like Caja file manager, Pluma text editor etc.) the same happened to every single application of the project.

Difficult to fix

The bug has been reported to the upstream immediately. The MATE project maintainres responded that the bug came from Transifex: it is pointless to fix it in the MATE source code repository because the next pull will overwrite the fix.

Unfortunately, it is not so easy to file a ticket in Transifex. It does not have Bugzilla nor any other ticket system. However, some people managed to contact Transifex team. They responded that they have pulled the plural rules from CLDR which lists 4 plural forms for the Polish language although they admitted that assigning the number 14 to the few plural group is their fault and fixed this. As MATE project continues pulling translations from Transifex more and more of their applications will start handling the number 14 correctly. Some of the applications have been updated recently, the update is a part of the 1.19 development release.

What CLDR says

Let’s look what CLDR database says about the Polish plural rules. Indeed, it lists 4 groups and there is a mysterious v parameter which has something in common with fractions because the sample expressions display the fractional forms. But as gettext supports integer values only we should drop the fractional cases totally.

The documentation of that v parameter is difficult to find but as soon as you find it you can read it means number of visible fraction digits in n, with trailing zeros. In this sentence, n is the number controlling the plural form itself.

Other languages

CLDR provides additional forms for fractions for other languages as well: Czech, Manx, Russian, Slovak, Ukrainian. For some other languages (Bosnian, Croatian, Filipino, Macedonian, Serbian, Lower and Upper Sorbian) the rules seem to be even more complex: fractional values belong to multiple integer groups.

This should be a warning for other languages that their rules might have been broken in Transifex as well. However, the further investigation of MATE Desktop source code does not reveal any recent changes in plural rules of other languages.

Conclusions

It seems that pulling plural rules from CLDR automatically is not a good idea.

Translators and language coordinators: please make sure that your plural rules are correct.

Transifex and other translation platforms: please don’t pull the translation rules from CLDR without a thorough analysis. Better ask the language communities and reuse the existing rules.

CLDR: please simplify your plural expressions and make the documentation of fractions support easier to access.